Lenses for viewing, understanding, and analyzing the depth of Pacific Rim.

 

http://cutehipsterwitch.tumblr.com/post/72968776636/the-thing-about-pacific-rim-for-me-though-after

cutehipsterwitch:

The thing about Pacific Rim for me, though

after Mako Mori and the glorious colour palette and that delightful uplifting score

is the unflinching optimism of it all

the idea that my generation, and the next, and the one after would look giant monsters in the eye and face the end of our world…

pocketaimee:

This is what happened after the end of the movie. You cannot convince me otherwise!!

(Credit for this idea goes to you, anonymous dude on 4chan. You’re awesome.)

FUCK YEAH MAKO MORI!: ave-atque-vale: favoritezipper: Okay, so I don’t agree that Raleigh is...

ave-atque-vale:

favoritezipper:

Okay, so I don’t agree that Raleigh is angry with Mako that she is criticizing him in the sparring scene, and I would think less of him if I interpreted his reaction as such? Raleigh is more mature than that; if he was found wanting by someone, he might…

street-of-mercy:

Pacific Rim - Man, Machines, and Monsters

A concept of Raleigh Becket and Mako Mori looking out to sea from the Shatterdome walls by Guy Davis and Hugo Martin

Another depiction of the scene in which Raleigh and Mako talk on the Shatterdome ramparts by artist Keith Thompson

A page from Director Guillermo del Toro’s notebook depicting a flower blooming on the Shatterdome wall

Pacific Rim Is Not Your Average Action Juggernaut

closetcinephile:

Awesome review for Pacific Rim! Hopefully this is a game changer for Hollywood and how they create their films. See if you can come up with a list of action films where there is no overly sexualized female as well as a no romantic subplot. Very few. 

The Mako Mori Test: 'Pacific Rim' inspires a Bechdel Test alternative

bookshop:

[READ MORE]

etonia:

sahnin:

Look at the bottom right panel. Look how Mako is holding her fists.  That is not a damsel in distress standing by idly as Raleigh acts as a white knight.  That’s a woman barely containing her own desire to punch Chuck in the face.  And ready to step in if Chuck had the upper hand instead of Raleigh.

The fact that Mako did NOT take off after Chuck herself doesn’t make her weak.  In fact it took great strength for her to not engage.  

And don’t think Raleigh was doing it just because he sassed Mako.  He’d been wanting to take a swing at Chuck for days by this point.  She was a convenient excuse.

Oh my god, ALL OF THIS. ALL OF IT. 

(Source: samwilsons)

stickmarionette:

chaila:

helenhasnomiddlename:

(Includes some spoilers)
On Mako and Stacker’s relationship
In the beginning when Mako is introduced to Raleigh, she says “Imeji to chigau,” to Stacker, meaning “(he) is different than I thought.” When I heard her say this, I thought it was weird for her to use such informal language towards her superior. If she were actually talking to her superior, she would have said “Imeji to chigaimasu," which would be a more formal way of saying so. I thought it was a minor slip-up with the script, as not many writers look too much into the culture basics of foreign languages when writing dialogue (although towards Raleigh, she speaks formally). Later on we find out that she is actually his adoptive daughter, and I realized why she used such informal language. Although in English, she may speak to Stacker in a way of talking to her superior, in Japanese, her mother tongue, she uses an informal, friendly way of talking to Stacker, her father figure. 

I love that the movie paid attention to this. I loved the little ways it became clear that he, as her adoptive dad, didn’t force her out of her native language or culture, but instead tried to adopt some of it with her, in a respectful way. He speaks Japanese with her—does she speak Japanese to anyone in this movie besides him, apart from the response to Raleigh?—he bows in greeting, etc. She’s speaking English with him when updating him as her superior about the candidate trials, but when she starts to get angry and beg for the chance he promised her, she switches to Japanese. When he’s telling her “More control” during the fight, he does it in Japanese but he calls her “Miss Mori” like a superior would. It’s this really great mix of informal family intimacy and the formality of their now professional relationship, and it shows a lot of mutual respect. These little moments revealed the closeness of their relationship, the way their family bond is intertwined with the formal rank structure, the way they’ve built a solid family of two, in really subtle ways. 
It is little things like this that surprised me in a thoroughly pleasant way about the movie, and are why I really liked it a lot. I like that the movie took *time* to pay attention to these things, took time to give us little moments whose implications mean a lot for the characters, amidst the dinosaur-punching. 

Frankly it’s a miracle that any Hollywood production paid this much attention to a foreign culture/language. Love it.

stickmarionette:

chaila:

helenhasnomiddlename:

(Includes some spoilers)

On Mako and Stacker’s relationship

In the beginning when Mako is introduced to Raleigh, she says “Imeji to chigau,” to Stacker, meaning “(he) is different than I thought.” When I heard her say this, I thought it was weird for her to use such informal language towards her superior. If she were actually talking to her superior, she would have said “Imeji to chigaimasu," which would be a more formal way of saying so. I thought it was a minor slip-up with the script, as not many writers look too much into the culture basics of foreign languages when writing dialogue (although towards Raleigh, she speaks formally). Later on we find out that she is actually his adoptive daughter, and I realized why she used such informal language. Although in English, she may speak to Stacker in a way of talking to her superior, in Japanese, her mother tongue, she uses an informal, friendly way of talking to Stacker, her father figure. 

I love that the movie paid attention to this. I loved the little ways it became clear that he, as her adoptive dad, didn’t force her out of her native language or culture, but instead tried to adopt some of it with her, in a respectful way. He speaks Japanese with her—does she speak Japanese to anyone in this movie besides him, apart from the response to Raleigh?—he bows in greeting, etc. She’s speaking English with him when updating him as her superior about the candidate trials, but when she starts to get angry and beg for the chance he promised her, she switches to Japanese. When he’s telling her “More control” during the fight, he does it in Japanese but he calls her “Miss Mori” like a superior would. It’s this really great mix of informal family intimacy and the formality of their now professional relationship, and it shows a lot of mutual respect. These little moments revealed the closeness of their relationship, the way their family bond is intertwined with the formal rank structure, the way they’ve built a solid family of two, in really subtle ways. 

It is little things like this that surprised me in a thoroughly pleasant way about the movie, and are why I really liked it a lot. I like that the movie took *time* to pay attention to these things, took time to give us little moments whose implications mean a lot for the characters, amidst the dinosaur-punching. 

Frankly it’s a miracle that any Hollywood production paid this much attention to a foreign culture/language. Love it.

Guillermo del Toro's Sketchbook - Imgur

thefirmamentblog:

These images from Guillermo del Toro’s sketchbooks just make me respect his cinematic vision even more. I read The New Yorker profile of del Toro a few years ago, and that’s where I first learned about his special notebooks. So glad to see some pages from them.